The material in this thesis is copyright, but it may, of course, be quoted in the usual way.

The hyperlinks in the text will obviously work best if the whole file is allowed to download first (the average file size is about 110 KB for each play, so downloading is reasonably quick).

The text has been prepared using Microsoft FrontPage 2000 with fonts available with this software.  In some browsers the layout may not appear as intended, and certain characters will not appear as they should (for example, Greek text [e.g. Αίκατερίνα] and letters from other languages [e.g. ▀ and ע]; and also some symbols used in sixteenth and seventeenth century typographic conventions [e.g. c§tinue wt th; Ůe quen was oway ytuiзt | Wi■ fairi for■ ynome]).

A note on changes in the text as a result of re-typing for web pages.

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THE DRAMATIC FUNCTION OF DISORDER, CONFLICT AND VIOLENCE

IN SHAKESPEARE'S COMEDIES AND ROMANCES

by

Raymond Justin Hoole

submitted in accordance with the requirements

for the degree of

DOCTOR OF LITERATURE AND PHILOSOPHY

in the subject

ENGLISH

at the

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH AFRICA

PROMOTER: PROFESSOR R.I. FERGUSON

SEPTEMBER 1989


 

IN MEMORY OF MY BROTHER

 

GERALD WATSON HOOLE

 

23.7.1946 - 24.12.1987

 


CONTENTS

   Summary

  Acknowledgements

   Introduction

   Chapter One: The Early Comedies (I)

        The Comedy of Errors   

        The Taming of the Shrew 

        Conclusion

   Chapter Two: The Early Comedies (II)

        The Two Gentlemen of Verona   

        Love's Labour's Lost

        Conclusion

    Chapter Three: The Middle Comedies (I)

        A Midsummer Night's Dream  

        The Merry Wives of Windsor  

        The Merchant of Venice

        Conclusion

    Chapter Four: The Middle Comedies (II)

        Much Ado about Nothing

        As You Like It

        Twelfth Night 

        Conclusion

    Chapter Five: The Dark Comedies

        All's Well That Ends Well  

        Measure for Measure  

        Conclusion

    Chapter Six: The Romances

        Pericles  

        Cymbeline  

        The Winter's Tale

        The Tempest

        Conclusion

    Chapter Seven: Conclusions

    Appendix One: Some Recent Shakespearean Productions

    Appendix Two: Location of Primary Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Sources

    Select Bibliography

 


 

NOTE ON THE TEXT IN

THESE WEB PAGES

     The text given in this web site  is that of the thesis I presented for my doctorate.  I have tried to give the text as it was in my thesis, which was originally processed on an Amstrad PCW 9512.  In re-typing it for web pages there have inevitably been some changes in format and design. These include the following:

    1.  For ease of reference page numbers are placed at the top of each page where they appear at the foot of the page in the original.  Page numbers are placed between hyphens, thus: - iii -, or - 123 - .  Page breaks are indicated by a horizontal line on the web page; because of different font sizes and line lengths, these page breaks do not always appear at the ends of lines as they naturally do in the original.  Also, lines may start with hyphens, which would not have been allowed in the original.

    2.  Titles which were underlined in the original have been italicised here.

    3.  The Notes have been placed at the end of each web page, and not at the end of each chapter as in the original.  Numbers to notes have been prefixed by their chapters, so that the fifth note in the third chapter appears as 3.5; in the original it would have appeared simply as 5 in chapter 3.

    4.  References to other pages in my thesis are indicated by page numbers as in the original, but here I have added hyperlinks for the reader's convenience.

    5.  Hyperlinks appear underlined in the text, and this means that if the title of a play is used as a hyperlink, it will appear in italics and underlined.

    6.  I have omitted the Index.

 

Return to Title Page

 


 

Proceed   to Summary, Acknowledgements and Introduction

 

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